Turbocharger Installation

****IMPORTANT****

Prior to re-installing your new or newly rebuilt turbocharger you need to find and  repair the problem that caused the turbocharger to fail in the first place. Failure to do so will only result in additional failure that will not be warrantable.

CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL, OIL FILTER & AIR FILTER

Use only a type and grade of oil which is specified in the vehicle manufacturer's service manual. Oil additives should not be used unless specifically approved by the vehicle manufacturer. Clean and/or replace air filter.

THOROUGHLY CLEAN TURBO OIL FEED LINES

Remove and clean or replace lines if necessary. Many non-metal oil lines can have linings crack from movement on the inside that cannot be seen.

INSPECT INTAKE & EXHAUST SYSTEMS TO AND FROM TURBO

Check for and remove any foreign objects. Be very thorough, even small particles can cause severe damage when inducted under high speed turbo operation.

REMOVE & CLEAN TURBO OIL DRAIN TUBE

Ensure oil can properly drain through line; restricted drain lines are a leading contributor to turbo oil leaks. Make sure you have the proper oil drain line size for your application.

PRE-LUBE TURBOCHARGER

Pre-lube the turbocharger prior to first start up. With engine NOT running; add clean engine oil to the oil inlet of the turbo while turning the shaft by hand until oil comes out of the drain. Use of a squeeze bottle or pump can is recommended to expedite this process.

TURBO WARM-UP

Operate engine at low idle for at least 5 minutes - DO NOT REV ENGINE. WARRANTY RETURNS

In order to warranty a part, or turbo, it must be returned to us for inspection in its “as-is” condition (not cleaned or disassembled). In some cases, we must forward the part or turbo to the manufacturer in order for them to do their own inspection. This process can take 1-2 weeks. Your warranty return must have a copy of original invoice, an RGA# and form filled out.

TO SAVE YOU TIME, MONEY, AND FRUSTRATION: PLEASE LISTEN TO OUR ADVICE:

All too often, in the event of malfunction of a turbocharged engine, the turbocharger is immediately assumed to be at fault and is replaced. Without proper diagnosis of turbocharger failure this can lead to a very frustrating and expensive time. Frequently, the replacement unit soon fails, finally prompting an investigation into the real cause of the initial failure.


THIS IS AVOIDABLE WITH SYSTEMATIC TROUBLE-SHOOTING.

Stringent quality control makes it extremely unlikely that a turbocharger could leave the factory, or our shop, incorrectly assembled, or not up to specifications. A “bad” turbocharger would operate badly almost from the moment of installation, but a turbocharger which has operated successfully for a period of time, and then fails, almost invariably fails because of a deficiency in the operation of the associated engine systems. Years of actual experience with service failures demonstrate the major cause of turbocharger failures to be faulty lubrication systems. Abnormal wear in the bearings or seals results from abrasive contaminants in the oil, or an insufficient supply of oil. Other systems, such as fuel and ignition, can also play a part in causing engine troubles in which turbocharger system malfunction is originally suspected.

Even perfectly operational turbocharger system components cannot compensate for incorrect engine operating procedures, deficiencies in the engine oil supply, oil drain, ignitions, air induction, fuel, or exhaust systems, or for damaged internal engine components.